Did E’er Such Love and Sorrow Meet?

People are asking very legitimate questions about suffering during these days after the Newtown shootings. Below is part of our family’s Christmas newsletter in 2005, the year we got Gwendolyn’s diagnosis and watched her suffer through seizures almost every day. 

Christmas is a time of contrasts. So many people generously give to others in need. But there seems to be so much need. Families put up lights and decorations while darkness clouds their relationships. We shop and spend and wrap gifts and cook and party to the point of fatigue, and then we complain that there isn’t enough time or money to enjoy these days. We mumble, “Happy Holidays” and wonder why we have lost the spirit of the season.

Some might say that Christmas is escapism. For a short time we try to forget about the troubles in the world. Tsunamis, wars, and hurricanes have challenged our compassion and understanding. Can there really be a God who cares and who can do anything about it?

We have wrestled with this question even more personally this year [in 2005]. Can we trust God when Gwendolyn’s seizures don’t seem to stop? If He can heal her, why doesn’t He?

God is not silent about suffering. One of oldest books in the Old Testament, Job, is a story about suffering. Job was a righteous man. God blessed him with many children and possessions. But one day, that all changed. His livestock was stolen. His servants were killed. And even his children died in a storm. Then he lost his health, suffering painful boils all over his body.

How did Job respond? He did not curse God; he did not sin. He kept trusting God. Job’s friends were convinced that Job (or his children) had sinned and deserved God’s punishment. They debated with Job and begged him to repent. Job fought back and asked God for a fair hearing. Surely God would correct this injustice.

Finally, God appeared. “Instruct me,” He asked. “Tell me where you were when I laid the foundations of the world? Where were you when I created the stars?” Job finally understood. His circumstances were not determined solely by his behavior. God had a larger plan. And He didn’t explain it all to Job.

We don’t always get what we deserve. And thank God for that! Usually we deserve much worse than we get. Why do we struggle so much when adversity comes? Because pain hurts, and we don’t like it. But the truth is that God has never left us, never forsaken us, and never stopped loving us.

Jesus didn’t initially get what He deserved either. The King of Kings was born in poverty and then cruelly executed. But His perfect life and death and subsequent resurrection made a way for us. Now, He is exalted in His rightful place. And we can have eternal Life and a home with Him forever. Jesus is the answer for suffering.

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So-Called “Three-Parent IVF” is a Bad Idea, Medically and Theologically, (Part 2)

In part one, I discussed the medical background and risks of a potential IVF treatment for certain mitochondrial diseases. In this final part, I will explain the theological problems the procedure presents.

God is the Author of Life
In Acts 3:15, Peter calls Jesus the Author (or Prince) of life. The word translated as author/prince is “archegos,” which comes from a root meaning “first,” “source,” “head,” or “ruler.” It is used of military leaders, city founders, or originators/authors. Jesus is also the “archegos” of our salvation in Hebrews 2:10 and the “archegos” of our faith in Hebrews 12:2. It is God (through Jesus) who created life. He is still the Creator, and life is His most extravagant creation. It is usurping His position, then, to assert our own right to create life (according to our image and wisdom) as this procedure attempts to do. Quite simply it is overstepping our bounds. The Bible calls this crossing of the line “transgression,” one of its word pictures for sin.

The Scriptures are full of examples of God’s power to give life. From Abraham’s and Sarah’s son born in their old age (Isaac), to Hannah’s son, Samuel, to the birth of John to Zechariah and Elizabeth in their old age, to the virgin birth of Jesus to Mary, to the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, there is no denying God’s miraculous power to give life. Melanie and I have also experienced this miraculous power. After years of infertility, God stepped in and brought life to us — not when we thought it was best, but when He knew it was best. (We really thought it was the worst possible time, but that is a story for another day.) We did not need IVF; we just needed to trust God to be Author of life. He gave us our first born son, Aidan, and our parenting journey began.

God is the Authority Over Life
The additional meanings of “archegos” teach us that Jesus (who is God) is not just the source of the beginning of life; He is also the authority (or captain) over life. The context of Acts 3:15 sheds important light on this. Peter was explaining the healing of a lame beggar outside the Temple. He had been lame since birth, yet God had a marvelous plan for his life. In the name of Jesus, Peter and John brought complete healing to this man to the amazement of all who had seen him lame for years. As Peter explained that the risen Jesus was the power behind the miracle, they proclaimed Jesus (the one the Jews had killed) as the Author of life. This was vividly demonstrated by the indisputable healing of the beggar. Who are we, then, to say that God has no plan for those who suffer from disease? While certainly there is room for us to relieve suffering and offer healing, it is not our purview to try and eliminate suffering as if we were the masters over life. There is great value in suffering that today’s quick fix culture fails to consider. Even in disease and suffering, God is still good. It is in our suffering that we can truly experience His goodness.

God in Our Lives
We have also experienced this first hand. Gwendolyn suffers having an incurable mitochondrial disease. For years, she had dozens to hundreds of seizures per day. Now she does not sit on her own or talk on her own or lots of other things that an eight year old girl should do. We suffer to care for her and provide for her. Her schedule is draining. We deal with therapists and doctors and special education teachers and insurance and medical supply companies and all manner of difficulties (even churches that won’t help). And, yet, we see great good in our journey. Without Gwendolyn, we would never have understood compassion as we do now. We wouldn’t know as much about selfless love. And we would not have known how sweet a personality can shine through even without words without having Gwendolyn. We do not understand all that God is doing, but we have found that He is good. He is the Authority over life.

Our trust of God as the Author and Authority over life was tested again in the birth of Lincoln, our youngest. Science said that we would have a 25% chance of having another child like Gwendolyn. There is no random chance with God, though. We trusted Him that whatever He chose to do would be good and right. Even after a miscarriage, we trusted God as the Author of life. And he blessed us with a great little boy. Lincoln has no symptoms of mitochondrial disease and is a joy to our whole family.

So, this so-called “three-parent IVF” process is medically perilous (part one) and an affront to the Author of life. The researchers should walk away from it now.

SOURCE
archo” article in Theological Dictionary of the New Testament